Friday, February 28, 2014

David Davies In Live Swinger vs Smooth Smackdown At Sandown Park

We're very excited to announce that Olympic Silver and Bronze Medallist David Davies will be Swim Smooth's special guest tomorrow (Saturday) at The Triathlon Show in Sandown Park!

Join Paul Newsome at 2pm in the Zoggs endless pool for the biggest Swinger vs. Smooth smackdown yet! We'll be comparing Dave's classic Swinger style with another famous name from British swimming who has a classically long Smooth freestyle stroke. Which stroke style is best and which should you use yourself? Find out live on Saturday!


Also join Dave and Paul Newsome at 11:30am in the 220 Theatre where they look at classic swim styles and how to improve each. The seminar will be packed with insight and tips to improve your own stroke technique.

You can see Swim Smooth's full schedule of other seminars and endless pool sessions at the show and the following weekend in Manchester here. Remember to bring your swim footage on a USB drive to our stand (next door to HUUB) and a full Swim Smooth coach will analyse your stroke for you. :)

Swinger vs. Smooth

At the core of Swim Smooth's coaching philosophy is our recognition of two 'ideal' swim strokes, the Swinger and the Smooth. This is quite a step away from convention as swimming coaches have traditionally only recognised the Smooth as worthy of emulation but that disregards amazing swimmers such as David Davies, Laure Manadou, Shelley Taylor Smith and the Brownlee brothers:

Jono Van Hazel is a classic Smooth

Mel Benson is a classic Swinger
Each stroke style is equally valid and has strengths and weaknesses to it. One will naturally suit you more than the other, identify which works best for you and your swimming will really start to click!

Find out more at: www.swimtypes.com

Swim Smooth!

10 comments:

Jim said...

Hi Paul & Team,
I always enjoy your posts/lessons/philosophy.
As someone lucky enough to swim a lot
more in the pond these days(I retired) vs the pool, there's always some interesting 'food for thought'.

Our ocean temps are on the cool side(our winter)but will soon be creeping up.
-More fun to swim w/dolphins when they honor us w.their presence!

Keep up the great work,
Good on ya!

Jim Malina
Redondo Bch., CA

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BIGPROFITBUZZ said...
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satisfEYEd said...

A Classic Smooth always gets my vote. I'm a smooth, but I could always be "smoother". Thanks for the inspiration.

Gert Kruger said...

Hi all,

my impression of the smooth vs. swinger is that it is not all up to the neurological control of the movement that dictates the movement. I am not a biokineticist, but the ratio
between muscle strength of the different muscles probably also play a role in the movement. Comparing Jono van Hazel and Mel Bensons' shoulders, it appears that Jono's deltoid is better developed (sorry Mel). It may just be that the higher elbow flexes the shoulder into a position that pronounces the muscle more. I guess that it is easier for the stronger deltoid to lift the high elbow, while the swinger relies on momentum to swing the hand across for entry. The recent "smackdown" between Ross Davenport and David Davies reinforced my suspicion. This probably explains why it is hard to change your style, it takes time (a lot) for the muscle to adapt. Since swimming itself is mainly aerobic (when aiming for fitness) dry land exercises that target specific muscles will probably help to change your style. I'm sorry if this is going to ignite a flame war, my point of view is only analytical. Should one try to change your style, or stick with what you are comfortable with? I.m.o. the swinger action accommodates a weaker shoulder, trying to change your style should only be done after the muscles have been conditioned for the new work. Ironically the swinging action strains your shoulder more (imo), due to the larger inertia of your arm 'flying' around further away from your body. Why then does the higher strain then not lead to hypertrophy of the appropriate muscle? I explain this with an analogy we see often in the gym, people trying to lift weight (more than they can handle) with the incorrect form, which is often accompanied with momentum. Hence the tendons and joints are overly stressed, but the muscle is not responsible for the eccentric contraction, hence it is not exercised, hence no hypertrophy, but only increased risk of injury...

Kind Regards,
Gert

Shonen Marin said...

Here's three minutes of the Swinger vs Smooth smackdown. It's not often that you get to watch champion swimmers close up & live, especially while standing still!

Annie Oberlin-Harris said...

Hi Jim- Very jealous you get to swim with dolphins!

SatisEYEd- keep swimming smoooth!

Hi Gert - Each stroke style is equally valid and has strengths and weaknesses to it. One will naturally suit you more than the other, identify which works best for you.

Ensuring you correct any stroke flaws such as thumb first entry and/or internally rotating the arm on arm recoveries will prevent injury risk.

You do not need to significantly change your natural musculature to change your stroke style- most people just need to work with what they've got and find the best style for them as individuals, hence Mel Benson does not have hypertrophic deltoids etc but still is 7 times world marathon swimming champion. I hope that helps!

Annie Oberlin-Harris said...

Hi Shonen- That link doesn't seem to work?

Shonen Marin said...

Hi Annie,

Let's try again: Here's three minutes of the Swinger vs Smooth smackdown.

Annie Oberlin-Harris said...

Thanks Shonen that's great!